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New Delhi: ‘Docu on delegation of fiscal powers to CIC goes missing’

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akhilesh yadav

NEW DELHI: A file related to delegation of financial powers to chief information commissioner is untraceable in the government according to a RTI response.

 

According to the RTI Act, only chief information commissioner (CIC) has financial, administrative and general superintendence powers.

 

 

Read at: ?Docu on delegation of fiscal powers to CIC goes missing? - The Times of India

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akhilesh yadav

[h=1]File on financial powers of CIC untraceable: DoPT[/h]New Delhi: A crucial file related to delegation of financial powers to Chief Information Commissioner is untraceable in the Department of Personnel and Training, an RTI reply from the Government said.

 

 

According to the RTI Act, only Chief Information Commissioner (CIC) has financial, administrative and general superintendence powers.

 

 

An RTI activist Lokesh Batra had sought to know from the Department of Personnel and Training (DoPT) about the file on which delegation of financial power by Central Government to Chief Information Commissioner in 2005-06 was processed.

 

 

In response, the DoPT said, the concerned file no 1/42/2005-IR was not traceable. "However, the present file in which the above matter is being dealt with is 4/26/2007-IR."

 

 

Read at: File on financial powers of CIC untraceable: DoPT | Zee News

 

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akhilesh yadav

NEW DELHI: In what is being seen as a major dent to the autonomy of the Central Information Commission (CIC), the BJP government has refused to return the financial powers to the newly-appointed chief information commissioner.

 

 

Read more at:

Government refuses to return chief information commissioner's financial powers - The Economic Times

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akhilesh yadav

Centre restores financial powers of chief information commissioner

 

NEW DELHI: The Centre has restored the financial powers of the chief information commissioner - which is considered a key to maintain the autonomy and independence of the Central Information Commission.

 

 

Read more at : Centre restores financial powers of chief information commissioner - The Economic Times

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Prasad GLN

It is not clear as to whether some one in CIC can exercise the financial powers when the post is vacant.

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karira

ALL threads related to "financial powers to CIC" have been merged into one single thread.

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