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Atul Patankar

Under Right to Information Act, Scarlett’s mother questions murder probe

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Atul Patankar

As reported at www.thaindian.com on 12 March 2009

 

Panaji, March 12 (IANS) Fiona Mackeown, the mother of slain British teenager Scarlett Keeling, has filed a Right to Information (RTI) application seeking details of the Goa police’s investigation into her daughter’s mysterious death February last year.

 

The application was received by the police early this week. Police authorities, who have been target of Fiona’s criticism for bungling the investigations into Scarlett’s murder, are not sure how the RTI application should be handled.

 

A senior police official maintained foreigners do not have the right to apply under the Right to Information Act. “Only citizens can ask queries under RTI. Foreigners cannot. Plus she has sent it across from UK by e-mail without paying the mandatory court fees,” the official said.

The preamble to the RTI Act clearly says that it can be used only by Indian citizens, the official added.

 

Confirming the receipt of the RTI query from Fiona, Superintendent of Police (North) Tony Fernandes Thursday said: “We have received the RTI application. In all likelihood, we’ll forward it to the Central Bureau of Investigation, because they are investigating the case now. “I have brought the matter to the notice of my superiors, who will take a final call.”

 

Source: Under Right to Information Act, Scarlett’s mother questions murder probe

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