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ganpat1956

Top score but IIM will not take her in

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ganpat1956

Bangalore, February 23, 2007

 

The wait is certainly agonizing for Vaishanavi Kasturi, a visually impaired student, as she knocks on the doors of the Indian Institute of Management-Bangalore to know why she could not make it despite her excellent performance in CAT 2006.

 

On Friday, Vaishanavi’s father RK Kasturi spent several hours closeted with a team of officials from IIM-B, asking them why his daughter was not called for a group discussion and personal interview. Vaishanavi cleared the CAT with a percentile of 89.29, outdoing thousands of other candidates. She was certainly eligible to sit for the next round of tests — the group discussion and interview — what with the IIM-B setting a cut-off of 86.42 percentile for the disabled. But the call never came.

 

Disappointed, Vaishanavi’s family filed a notice under the Right to Information Act, which got Kasturi the meeting with the school authorities.

 

At the end of the discussion, Kasturi still did not have an answer for his daughter. He told the Hindustan Times: “They told us that she did not make it because others (in the category of applicants with physical disabilities) were graduates or had work experience, etc. We had a long meeting and discussed many things because we want to understand where we stand. Let us wait till Monday (February 26). We have to attend a hearing at the RTI Commissioner’s office that day. The group discussions and interviews are scheduled for April. Let us see what happens on Monday.”

 

For Vaishnavi — a sixth semester BCom student of a local college — the doors to IIM-B may not have opened for her but another prestigious institute, the MS Ramaiah Institute of Management, has offered her a free seat for a post-graduate diploma in management.

 

Vaishanavi, however, still hopes she will qualify for the Indian Institute of Management-Bangalore at the end of the hearing at the RTI Commissioner’s office in the state capital on Monday.

 

IIM says no to top scorer : HindustanTimes.com

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ganpat1956

Bangalore: The Indian Institute of Management-Bangalore, at the RTI hearing of MBA aspirant Vaishnavi Kasturi, on Monday said that it has informally given all information to Vaishnavi's parents and won't give it in writing as it is not under public domain.

 

Visually impaired Vaishnavi failed to get through IIM-B despite having scored well in the Common Admission Test. Shocked at her exclusion, she demanded a list of credentials of the blind candidates short-listed by the Institute.

 

But when they denied declaring the cut-off marks and said such information is confidential, Vaishnavi's family slapped a RTI notice on the institute.

 

Meanwhile, the reason that the premier institute gave for not advancing her to the next admission stage was that they consider other criteria like graduation and class 12 and class 10 marks for admissions as well, and Vaishnavi was found to be lacking there.

 

Vaishnavi's parents however say they will continue to fight for making the selection process in IIMs transparent.

 

The next RTI hearing is on April 23, which will ascertain the jurisdiction - state or central information commission that the case would come under.

IIM-B comes clean on Vaishnavi's RTI : IIM bangalore, RTI, Vaishnavi Kasturi, CAT : IBNLive.com : CNN-IBN

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karira

Just an update on this.

Hearing with CIC took place on 28 May 2007.

 

The CIC has been requested by IIMB to hear a specialist from the admissions committee on 18th June and has postponed the decision till then. The CIC has asked IIMB to pay economy class return fare by air to Vaishnavi and Rs. 500/- per day as DA since she has to come once again to Delhi.

 

Full decision can be viewed at:

 

http://cic.gov.in/CIC-Orders/Decision_28052007_39.pdf

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karira

Another update.

 

Disclose eligibility before CAT exams, CIC tells IIM-B

 

TIMES NEWS NETWORK

 

Bangalore: In what may change the face of one of the toughest entrance tests in the country — Common Admission Test (CAT) for admissions to the prestigious IIMs — the Central Information Commission (CIC) on Wednesday directed the IIMs to explore the possibilities of revealing the eligibility criteria before the applicants write the test.

 

The CIC was hearing the case of Vaishnavi Kasturi, a visually handicapped B.Com student who appeared for CAT 2007 and filed an application under the RTI Act, seeking names and percentile marks of candidates shortlisted under the Persons With Disability category for admission at IIM-B. The case is being heard in New Delhi.

 

At the hearing, IIM-B disclosed to the CIC that Vaishnavi, whose CAT rank was 47 was given a weightage of 20 for CAT, 15 for her class X performance, 10 for class XII performance, 15 for degree courses and 10 for her work experience.

 

When the CIC asked IIMB, represented by A R Ramesh and Indu Sekhar, how they had arrived at the scores , the institute said it was the eligibility criteria. To this CIC asked them to exactly define the criteria and be more transparent in their selection procedures.

 

The CIC set July 28 as the next hearing date where IIM-B should provide answers to the six questions posed by Vaishnavi on the selection procedures followed during selection of candidates for IIM’s class of 2007.

IIM-B officials said the CIC’s suggestion to disclose the criteria will be taken up when the directors of IIMs meet later this month.

 

VAISHNAVI TO IIM-B UNDER THE RTI ACT

 

Provide me with the following information:

 

The cut-off percentile as mentioned in website for People With Disability (PWD) is 86.42. Please let me know why I have not been selected for the group discussion and personal interview even though my percentile is higher in this category ?

What other evaluation criteria have been applied for short-listing in PWD category?

If there is any other evaluation criteria, in addition to CAT scores, that has been applied please provide details of comparative evaluation with reference to my case and candidates who have been short-listed.

Please provide names and percentile marks obtained by candidates who have been shortlisted in PWD category?

In the CAT bulletin, it is stated that one percent of the seats is separately reserved for blind, out of 3 per cent of total reservation for PWD. Please provide names and percentile marks obtained by selected blind candidates for GD and PI and point out where I stand in this relative ranking.

In last 10 years from IIM-Bangalore how many blind students have graduated?

What are the appeal procedures in such cases and who is the person responsible to receive applications for reconsideration?

 

The Times of India ePaper

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ganpat1956

The decision of the CIC has come at last. On going through the original RTI application, the Commission found that several of the issues on which the information had been asked for had not been disclosed by the Respondents(IIM-B). The IC Shri Kejariwal has directed the IIM-B to provide Vaishnavi, all the information by July30,2007. The decison is available in the following link:

 

Decision No. CIC/OK/C/2007/00136 dated 13/07/2007 on Complaint from Ms. Vaishnavi Kasturi Vs Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore

 

The above decision also contains an interesting observation of the Commission, which may be useful to some of our readers. the marksheet – after the examinations was over – are in the public domain and there is no reason why this should not be disclosed or even liberally displayed.

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karira

Ganpat,

 

Many thanks for sharing. I was waiting and looking forward to reading it.

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ganpat1956

IIM-B makes selection criteria public

 

BANGALORE: After stating that its admission process was a 'trade secret', IIM-B made public its criteria for selecting students for its 2007 batch. It's the first time any IIM has revealed the selection process for admission to the post-graduate programme in management (PGP).

 

This is a fallout of the case involving IIM-B and Vaishanavi Kasturi, a visually challenged girl who filed an application under Right to Information (RTI) Act.

 

After being denied a seat in IIM-B, Vaishanavi sought to know the selection process. Central Information Commission (CIC), hearing the case, had set July 30 as the deadline for IIM-B to make its admission criteria public. IIM-B internally developed a process that seeks to identify the most promising candidates.

 

This has been progressively refined over the years based on data on CAT applicants and academic performance of candidates.

 

IIM-B makes selection criteria public-India-The Times of India

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ganpat1956

IIMB discloses admission criteria - the 'trade secret'

 

Bangalore: The Indian Institute of Management Bangalore (IIMB) has finally disclosed the criteria for selecting candidates to the post-graduate program in management (PGP) under the provision of Right to Information (RTI) Act. The admission process which was a 'trade secret' earlier now has been put on the institute's website for information.

 

This direction came after 22-year-old visually challenged woman Vaishnavi Kasturi, was first refused information by IIMB. The institute declined to give details until the Central Information Commission (CIC) took the matter into consideration. The CIC had directed IIMB to make its admission criteria public on or before July 30.

 

As per the detailed methodology published by IIMB, it has been revealed that a mere CAT score is not sufficient to get into an Indian Institute of Management (IIM). Having a CAT a good score means, the candidate is in the list of top 10% of CAT applicants.

 

In fact, when it comes to admission in IIMs, it's Class X and Class XII results which account more - 25% of the final score; a candidate's Bachelor's degree 15%. The factor with the maximum weightage is his/her performance in group discussion (GD), GD summary and personal interview - 35%. The rest 5% depends on work experience and whether a candidate has taken a "professional course". However, professional course does not imply a B.Tech degree from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) or any other prestigious college; only Chartered Accountancy course qualifies as a "professional course" for admission to PGP.

 

IIM applicants in the general category need to be in the top ten percent in CAT scores. But it is again important for them to be considered for the interview call, if they secure in the top 15% in each section of the test verbal, logic and data, quantitative. SC/ST and disabled applicants need to be in the top 50% in logic and quantitative and top 45% in verbal. In overall score, however, SC applicants need to be in the top 25% while STs in the top 35%.

 

IIMB discloses admission criteria – the ‘trade secret’, IIM News - By Indiaedunews.net

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karira

WoW !

 

So, finally, the CAT is out of the BAG.

Congratulations and Hats off to Ms. Vaishanavi Kasturi.

In my opinion, one of the best success stories of the RTI Act.

The best part is, all those people who studied a solid 18 months for CAT must be really upset with the revelation.

 

Now we have to wait till July 31 to see the result of the UPSC case.

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ganpat1956

You are absolutely right Karira. It is one of the very few threads that I have been following up, to end on such a successful note. The perseverance of Vaishnavi & her father Mr Kasturi deserves a special mention.

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karira

IIM aspirant denied admission

 

Friday, August 3, 2007 (Bangalore)

 

A visually impaired student has claimed that she was unfairly denied admission by the IIMs despite high scores.

 

Vyshnavi Kasturi filed a case under the RTI Act after being denied admission to IIM Bangalore (IIM B) despite scoring an impressive 89.5 percentile in her CAT score.

 

Shortly after the case came to light, the institute decided, for the first time ever, to clearly spell out admission criteria on the Internet. The institute says it has no separate reservation for the differently abled.

 

''Of course it hurts that Vyshanvi has not been able to make it. But we've come a long way. The personal battle might be slipping away from their hands but the larger cause has certainly been benefited. The IIM has now for the first time ever displayed its admission criteria on the Internet and will have to update it before every admission year,'' said R K Kasturi, Vyshnavi's father.

 

This for Vyshnavi means more than the seat itself.

 

''I am really happy that there are others who have benefited out of this battle that I have been fighting along with my family,'' said Vyshnavi.

 

But all hope is not lost as the family prepares to appeal to the High Court for a separate reservation for the visually impaired in educational institutes.

 

NDTV.com: IIM aspirant denied admission

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sidmis

The girl who took on the IIMs and dared to be different

Debanish Achom 09 October 2007, Tuesday

 

GETTING ADMISSION into the Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) is tough but not an impossible task. But what was tough and impossible was to find out how exactly the hallowed business school evaluated students who sat through the Common Admission Test (CAT). The public release of the information about how weightage is given to those who sit through CAT was made possible by the dedicated efforts of a bright student from Bangalore. She made IIM-B reveal how candidates were evaluated in CAT.

 

Vaishnavi Kasturi, a promising student from Bangalore got 89.29 percentile in the Common Admission Test (CAT) 2006 and the cut-off percentile being 86.42, she thought she will make it. But IIM-Bangalore refused to admit her. The CAT was ready to jump out of the bag. “Some tell me I’ve enjoyed my 15 minutes of fame. I don’t agree. The thing is at least people now know whether they should chain themselves to CAT,” she says. “The information IIM-B gave to me clearly showed that high school scores are important. So somebody who scored very high in CAT and low in the school boards will be sad to find they didn’t get through,” she says, “Now the public knows the weightage and they can make better decisions,” she added.

 

“I’ve come out stronger now,” Vaishnavi says. “There are more important things in life than CAT,” she says. “Oh! I love Carnatic music,” her smile says it all. She was given the Award for Excellence by the Governor of Karnakata.

 

Vaishnavi suffers from low vision, also known as RP(Retinitis Pigmentosa). She was diagnosed with RP at the age of 8. She wrote the CAT under the ‘People with Disability’(PWD) category. And she wanted to know why she was not selected although she scored above the cut-off percentile. “First we decided to meet the IIM Bangalore officials,” says her father, R K Kasturi. “When we asked them to tell us the methodology of judging candidates, they replied that it was a trade secret,” he says with bewilderment. “Nobody can run away with hiding education under the garb of being a trade secret,” he asserts.

 

Using the Right to Information Act (RTI), Vaishnavi asked the IIM-B to reveal “how they have evaluated her”. IIM-B replied by saying “it’s a trade secret,” again! By then it was too much. Questioning the IIM about the marks weightage and why it is not shared is necessary, says R K Kasturi.

“Vaishanavi’s rank in CAT was 19 out of 680 students under PWD category. Her ranking in 10th and 12th standard was different and hence she lost. This they refused to give officially which led to speculations,” he says.

 

Finally, she went to the Central Information Commission, and the Commission directed IIM-B to release information regarding how those sitting in the high posts in the IIMs judge the lives of lakhs of candidates, some of who hinge their fate to CAT. IIM-B for the first time in 25 years put the information on their website. “I won this,” she says.

This has clearly revealed that CAT is not given much importance and IIM concentrates more on 10th and 12th scores. “But where is the comparison? Intelligence required to be successful at CAT and high school exams are two different yardsticks,” says R K Kasturi.

 

“I want to say that people must come forward to ask questions. Every time CAT results are declared, they should ask questions if they honestly feel dissatisfied,” says Vaishnavi. “What happens is that disabled people’s abilities are underestimated. Somebody bright in Maths may be forced to take Arts and become a telephone operator in the end just because he or she is blind or deaf,” she says. Her father agrees. It’s the mindset of the parents and society as well that should change, he says. “Let physically challenged people do what they want. Don’t stop them,” he says.

Twelve blind students have appeared for CAT this year. The number is going to increase as more and more people become aware of the CAT process. “I love cricket too,” she says.

The girl who took on the IIMs and dared to be different

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maneesh

I agree with you karira and Ganpatji,

This is one of the best success story of RTI and i was reading with the eagerness of a good movie to find out what happens in the end.

Any further update, did she finally managed to get a seat??

 

There is one aspect which amuses me. That does the IIM believes that a student cannot improve during the graduation process. I know many students who were not that good in the X & XII but they improved like anything in the graduation. [ I am among one of them :) ]

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karira

Maneesh,

 

Finally she did not get in. Her X and XII marks were not upto the mark.

You are correct in saying that there is abnormal emphasis on those in the admission criteria....but atleast we know now what is the weightage for each type of criteria. Imagine the plight of those who enrolled for CAT classes and put in 1 or 2 years of hard work..only to find out that CAT has no weightage in the selection criteria. CAT is only used as a cut-off for going to the next stage of GD and interview. Only if the final scores (taking into account all criteria) are the same for two candidates, the final selection is based on who got higher marks in CAT and the number of questions answered in each section of CAT. Coaching classes must have made huge amounts of money just because this was kept as a "Trade Secret" by IIM.

Recently, in another decision, CIC wants IIM to disclose CAT scores. Please see:

http://www.rtiindia.org/forum/1553-cic-wants-iims-disclose-cat-scores.html

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karira

Posted by Uma on MyNews.in: Every Citizen Portal,India,World,Developement,Business,Politics News,Live Chat on 9/1/2008

 

CAT 2007 results show how scared IIMs are: An inside story*YOUTH & CAREER*NEWS MyNews.in:

CAT 2007 results show how scared IIMs are: An inside story

How a visually impaired girl brought down the elitist MBA Institutes

 

The CAT 2007 results are just out. Media reports say that 2.3 lakh candidates had appeared for the examinations. For those, who made it to the next round, congratulations, for those, who did not, here''s some solace.

 

For long, the Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) could do no wrong. Out of every 100 applications to the IIMs, just one student got through one of the seats to the six IIMs. For those who did not get in, it was a terrible of waste of one full year or more in preparation and worse, they did not even know whey they did not make it. All this, until recently.

 

22 year old Vaishnavi Kasturi is an intelligent budding manager. She scored over 85 percentile marks in her CAT 2006 exam. She also did her group discussion and personal interview well at IIM Bangalore where she was called. However, to her shock, she was not selected. The reason- Vaishavi is visually impaired. When Vaishnavi asked the IIM-B officials why she was not selected, she was told that IIMs do not disclose their admission criteria, as it is a 'trade secret'. An agitated Vaishnavi filed an RTI application and after long months of struggle managed to win the case.

 

Although Vaishnavi joined another college offering MBA, her travails with justice have meant that for the first time the IIMs will be disclosing all their sectional cut-offs officially on their websites. This is a historic step considering that any higher body has hardly questioned the IIMs over their admission process since their inception in the 1960s.

 

Reports have shown that other IIMs have also hidden RTI applications filed on them by young students whose only objective to do so was not to question the judgement but to learn where they went wrong in the first place.

 

Till recently, the IIMs were seen in major battles with the HRD ministry under which the institutes come. IIM wants more freedom in its decisions while the HRD ministry wants more control. That tussle maybe a long battle but the fact is that the IIMs have become very apprehensive over any slur on their brand name and have wisely taken the first step to restore student confidence. Surely, they know that there are several other good colleges in the country offering a MBA programme including ISB, SP Jain, XLRI, JBIMS and others.

 

For student information-There are seven IIMs in India. One each at Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Lucknow, Indore, Kozhikode, Kolkata and Shillong. Results show that those students who scored over 98 percentile overall and over 25 per cent in each of the sections i.e. Maths, English, Logic would most likely have cleared the first round. Each IIM has over 250 seats for the two-year management course called PGP except the one at Shillong, which has just started this year and will have 60 seats.

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