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karira

'30 yrs on, info on Emergency cannot be official secret'

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karira

As reported by Jaya Menon in timesofindia.indiatimes.com on 08 August 2010:

'30 yrs on, info on Emergency cannot be official secret' - India - The Times of India

 

'30 yrs on, info on Emergency cannot be official secret'

 

CHENNAI: So where are the records of India's "darkest days", the political period that seemed to spell curtains for democracy, the Emergency of 1975-1977? If replies to an RTI query are to be believed, no one knows where to find the communications between then President Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed and the government before and after the Emergency. And no one has any idea where to look for the relevant documents, notings and records of various decisions. These are not with us, says the ministry of home affairs, passing the buck to the National Archives of India (NAI). The NAI, which is the repository of 'non-current records' of the government of India, says nothing was transferred to it. So where did the records go?

 

"The presumption is that they (the officers) have either destroyed them or they don't want to give it away. In this context, one can only assume that all the allegations (pertaining to the Emergency period) against Indira Gandhi and Sanjay Gandhi were true," said M G Devasahayam, an ex-IAS officer who served as Chandigarh district magistrate during the Emergency.

 

On February 25, Devasahayam, who now lives in Chennai, set off a chain of extraordinary events with extraordinary implicationw when he sent an RTI application to Sanjukta Ray, deputy secretary and chief principal information officer in the prime minister's office (PMO). He asked for information on the "presidential proclamation of June 26, 1975, declaring a state of Emergency in the country that lasted up to March/April 1977".

 

The PMO replied on March 4, transferring the queries "for appropriate action" under Section 6(3) of the RTI Act, to the ministry of home affairs, the nodal ministry for enforcing the Emergency. On April 7, PK Mishra, a director in the home ministry, said the information sought was more than 25 years old and not available with the ministry. "As per Rule 5 of the Public Records Rules, 1997, the relevant records and documents may be available in the National Archives of India," he said, adding that a copy of Devasahayam's application had been forwarded to the NAI.

 

The NAI's response was prompt but the mystery only deepened. On May 11, Rajesh Verma, assistant director, NAI, wrote to Devasahayam, saying, "During a preliminary search, the requisite information sought could not be located ... since it has not been transferred to NAI."

 

On May 27, Devasahayam dashed off a complaint under Section 18 of the RTI Act to chief information commissioner Wajahat Habibullah but says his "good friend and batchmate...remains silent". Devasahayam says he wants the information, which is not under the Official Secrets Act, because "the country is yet to get over the hangover of the dark days. All that is going on now, the corruption in the system, has flowed from then".

 

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karira

As reported in indianexpress.com on 31 August 2010:

Emergency records can't be made public: Prez secretariat

 

Emergency records can't be made public: Prez secretariat

 

The communication between the then President Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed and Prime Minister Indira Gandhi on imposition of Emergency nearly 35 years ago cannot be made public, the President's Secretariat has said.

 

While withholding the information sought through an RTI plea, the Secretariat has cited Article 74 of the Constitution which says that the advice tendered by the Cabinet to the President "shall not be inquired into in any court".

 

In his RTI application, S C Agrawal had sought to know "complete and detailed information" on the declaration of internal Emergency in the country by the then President including any communication or advice received from Gandhi.

 

The reply from the President's Secretariat said, "The information sought is covered under Article 74 of the Constitution and hence cannot be disclosed."

 

"CPIO declined information as covered by Article 74 of the constitution and hence not disclosable (sic). But 'Right To Information Act 2005' has an over-riding effect on all previous provisions, and as such it is not justified to refuse any information which is not covered by section 8 of RTI Act," Agrawal said in his representation before the Appellate Authority at the Secretariat.

 

Quoting a news report on the issue, Agrawal said it indicated that no other public authorities including the Prime Minister's Office, Union Home Ministry or National Archives of India ever took the information as "undisclosable (sic)".

 

"Only thing (according to reports) was that the sought information could not be practically traced out. Now when the sought information exists at the President's Secretariat, it should not be denied because the sought information and documents are not covered by any of the sub-clauses of section eight," he said.

 

According to reports, former IAS officer M G Devasahayam has also filed a series of RTI application with the PMO seeking details of the Presidential proclamation of declaring Emergency in the country in 1975. But he could not get the information as it could not be traced.

 

The state of emergency was declared by Ahmed on advice by Gandhi on June 25, 1975 which lasted for 21 months till March 21, 1977.

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ambrish.p

As reported in Dainik Jagran on 01/09/10

 

Source: http://in.jagran.yahoo.com/epaper/article/index.php?page=article&choice=print_article&location=10&category=&articleid=911448126174698

 

आपातकाल के रिकॉर्ड नहीं किए जा सकते सार्वजनिक

 

नई दिल्ली, प्रेट्र : राष्ट्रपति सचिवालय ने कहा है कि 35 वर्ष पहले लगाए गए आपातकाल पर तत्कालीन प्रधानमंत्री इंदिरा गांधी और राष्ट्रपति फखरुद्दीन अली अहमद के बीच हुए संवाद को सार्वजनिक नहीं किया जा सकता। सचिवालय ने इस संबंध में संविधान के अनच्च्छेद 74 का हवाला देकर आरटीआई के तहत मांगी गई सूचना देने से इंकार कर दिया है। इस अनच्च्छेद के अनुसार राष्ट्रपति को मंत्रिमंडल की ओर से दी गई सलाह के बारे में किसी भी अदालत में पूछताछ नहीं की जा सकती है। एस.सी. अग्रवाल ने अपने आरटीआई आवेदन में तत्कालीन राष्ट्रपति द्वारा देश में आंतरिक आपातकाल की घोषणा के बारे में संपूर्ण और विस्तृत जानकारी मांगी थी जिसमें गांधी के साथ किसी संवाद या उनसे मिली किसी सलाह का ब्योरा देना भी शामिल है। अग्रवाल ने इस फैसले के खिलाफ सचिवालय के अपीलीय प्राधिकरण को दिए आवेदन में कहा है, सीपीआईओ ने सूचना देने से इंकार कर दिया क्योंकि ये सूचनाएं संविधान के च्नुच्छेद 74 के अंतर्गत आती है और उन्हें उजागर नहीं किया जा सकता। लेकिन सूचना का अधिकार कानून के तहत ऐसी कोई भी सूचना देने से इंकार करना उचित नहीं है जो आरटीआई कानून की धारा आठ के अंतर्गत नहीं आती। हाल की मीडिया रिपोर्ट के अनुसार मांगी गई सूचना ढूंढ़ी नहीं जा सकी थी। लेकिन अब जब यह सूचना राष्ट्रपति सचिवालय में है तो उसे देने से इंकार नहीं किया जाना चाहिए क्योंकि मांगी गई सूचना या दस्तावेज धारा आठ के किसी भी उपबंध में नहीं आते।

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karira

As reported by Jaya Menon in timesofindia.indiatimes.com on 02 September 2010:

A few 'missing' Emergency files found, says NAI - India - The Times of India

A few 'missing' Emergency files found, says NAI

 

CHENNAI: Some documents and records pertaining to the proclamation of Emergency in 1975, which were earlier said to be missing, have suddenly resurfaced.

 

Nearly three weeks after a report was published in TOI (August 8, 2010) about the mysterious disappearance of documents and records relating to the Emergency period, the National Archives of India (NAI), a repository of "non-current records", said it had located "a few files" received from the ministry of home affairs some time ago.

 

"Keeping in view the public concern, the records division had conducted fresh extensive search among the holdings and has been able to locate a few files on the subject which had been received from the ministry of home affairs some time back," said Rajesh Verma, assistant director of NAI and chief principal information officer.

 

Owing to the sensitive nature of the documents, they had been classified and subsequently declassified by the MHA before appraisal and transfer to NAI and had been kept separately, in light of instructions from the ministry.

 

"Hence, they do not figure in the general list of files transferred to the home department and all the officers of the records division were not aware of their availability," Verma said in a letter to MG Devasahayam, whose RTI application seeking Emergency-related documents had drawn a blank.

 

Devasahayam, an ex-IAS officer who served as Chandigarh district magistrate during the Emergency, had sent an RTI application to the Prime Minister's Office on February 25.

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karira

As reported by Manoj Mitta in timesofindia.indiatimes.com on 10 December 2010:

Emergency papers found, minus Indira signature - The Times of India

 

Emergency papers found, minus Indira signature

 

NEW DELHI: Six months after pleading ignorance about their whereabouts, the National Archives have come up with records of the infamous Emergency. Tell-tale gaps in the information though could well have been responsible for the delayed disclosure about a phase that the present rulers have much to be embarrassed about.

 

The original paperwork related to the proclamation of Emergency on June 25, 1975 and its draconian enforcement for 21 months has come into public domain thanks to the tenacity of RTI applicant M G Devasahayam, who had Jayaprakash Narayan in his custody for six months as the then deputy commissioner of Chandigarh.

 

Though his application was shunted from the Prime Minister's Office to the home ministry and then to the National Archives, what forced the authorities to give up their blocking tactics was Devasahayam's recourse to a complaint under RTI as that could have had penal consequences for those denying information.

 

The reams of documents given to Devasahayam betray extraordinary attempts to distance Indira Gandhi from much of the illegal decisions responsible for Emergency and its excesses. Though the signatures of other dramatis personae, President Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed downwards, are available on the Emergency records, there is none of Indira Gandhi herself in any of them.

 

The omission of Indira Gandhi's signature is most glaring in the file relating to the manner in which she had bypassed the Cabinet while asking Ahmed to sign the Emergency proclamation late in the night on June 25, 1975.

While the original proclamation bearing Ahmed's signature is available, there is only a typed copy of the PM's ''top secret'' letter that had recommended imposition of Emergency under Article 352 of the Constitution.

 

According to the file, the copy of Indira Gandhi's historic letter was obtained by the home ministry from the President's Secretariat. The original letter signed by Indira Gandhi was probably taken out of the file at some point and kept away in her personal papers, which are in the control of her family.

 

Whatever the reason for the missing original, the file nails the claim made by Indira Gandhi in her letter that she had information suggesting that ''there is an imminent danger to the security of India being threatened by internal disturbance.'' The file does not contain a shred of material backing such threat perception on the fateful day.

 

In fact, the file reveals that the first assessment of the alleged threat of internal disturbance was made more than a fortnight after the imposition of Emergency. It was in the form of a report on the situation before and after June 25, 1975 from the Intelligence Bureau submitted on July 11. This shows that India's hard-fought democracy was suspended on the perception of one individual, without any institutional checks.

 

The file is a treasure trove for historians as it brings out, among other things, the manner in which the Cabinet gave post-facto approval to Emergency at a meeting held at 6 am on June 26, 1975. It bears out the Shah Commission's finding that none of the Cabinet ministers was privy to the unprecedented decision to impose Emergency. Yet, the Cabinet and bureaucracy without demur facilitated the Emergency measures that followed quickly: imposition of press censorship and draconian amendments to preventive detention laws.

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Sajib Nandi

Release Emergency documents, CIC tells Rashtrapati Bhavan

 

As reported by http://www.deccanherald.com on June 15, 2011:

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/169165/release-emergency-documents-cic-tells.html

 

 

Just over a week before the 36th anniversary of the infamous Emergency, an order by the Central Information Commission (CIC) will likely give Indians a new hope to get more insights into the events leading to the presidential proclamation that heralded the darkest chapter in the country’s democratisation process.

 

The CIC on Wednesday directed the President’s secretariat to make public all information related to the proclamation of Emergency by the then President Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed on June 25, 1975, when Indira Gandhi was at the helm of power at the Centre.

 

Right to know

 

Pointing out that the citizens have a right to know about watershed events in the history of the nation, the commission asked the President’s secretariat to disclose all documents and correspondence received by the then President Ahmed from the then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi before he signed the order proclaiming the state of Emergency.

 

The CIC’s order will, of course, make the Congress squirm for, historically, the party has never been comfortable whenever the issue has been raised publicly.

 

“The public interest in disclosing the materials/documents on the basis of which Emergency was declared is immense and the citizens of India have a right to know the same. India needs to learn its lessons well, and without this information, citizens will not be able to derive the correct inferences of a watershed event in its journey of democracy,” Information Commissioner Shailesh Gandhi said.

 

The transparency panel rejected a plea made by the President’s secretariat Public Information Officer (PIO) contending that Article 74(2) of the Constitution put a bar on any court to inquire into any advice given by the Council of Ministers to the President.

 

Taking refuge under the explanation given by the Supreme Court’s nine-judge Bench in the 1994 S R Bommai case, the Central Information Commission said Article 74(2) of the Constitution merely barred an enquiry into the question whether any, and if so, what advice was tendered by the Council of Ministers to the President and the materials could not partake character of the advice.

 

“Consequently, a court can call upon such material to be disclosed before it, and though the sufficiency or otherwise of the material cannot be questioned, the legitimacy of the inference drawn from such material is open to judicial review,” the commission said.

Notably, Article 74(2) was introduced in the Constitution by then Prime Minister Gandhi through the 42nd Amendment in 1976 during the Emergency days which lasted for about 21 months till March 21, 1977.

 

The CIC allowed an appeal filed by noted RTI activist Subhash Chandra Agrawal against the decision of the President’s secretariat and directed disclosure of all information by July 10.

 

“The period of Emergency is considered to be the biggest challenge to India’s commitment to democracy. This period was symbolized by curtailment of fundamental rights of citizens, restrictions on freedom of press, illegal detention and abuse of citizens and enactment of draconian laws. Most institutions of governance when asked to bend prostrated themselves and crawled. This showed that the institutions of democracy had not become robust enough to withstand an assault. Given the same, it is (an) imperative for citizens to know the reasons why and how democracy in India was nearly lost,” the commission said in a six-page order.

 

Noting that the Right to Information is a fundamental right under Article 19 of the Constitution, the CIC, however, excluded the exact advice received from Indira Gandhi by President Ahmed for proclamation of Emergency.

 

CIC: Disclose Emergency documents

 

As reported by timesofindia.indiatimes.com on June 16, 2011:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/CIC-Disclose-Emergency-documents/articleshow/8870310.cms

 

NEW DELHI: The Central Information Commission on Wednesday directed the President's Secretariat to make public all the documents on the declaration of Emergency by the then President Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed in 1975, including communications from the then PM Indira Gandhi.

 

However, the transparency panel exempted any "advice" tendered by Gandhi to Ahmed on the imposition of Emergency as it would be a privileged document under Article 74 of the Constitution that cannot be made public. In his order on an RTI query, Information Commissioner Shailesh Gandhi termed the Emergency as a "challenge to India's commitment to democracy" that was symbolized by "curtailment of fundamental rights of citizens, restrictions on freedom of press, illegal detention and abuse of citizens and enactment of draconian laws".

 

"Most institutions of governance when asked to bend, prostrated themselves and crawled. This showed that the institutions of democracy had not become robust to withstand an assault. Given the same, it is imperative for citizens to know the reasons why and how democracy in India was nearly lost," Gandhi said and asked the President's Secretariat to disclose the details to the RTI applicant before July 10.

 

He further said there was "immense" public interest in disclosure of the materials and documents on the basis of which Emergency was declared. "The citizens of India have a right to know the same. India needs to learn its lessons well, and without this information, citizens will not be able to derive the correct inferences of a watershed event in its journey of democracy," Gandhi said while ordering the disclosure of documents.

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karira

As reported by IANS in msn.news.in.com on 12 July 2011:

http://news.in.msn.com/national/article.aspx?cp-documentid=5284685

 

No need to make emergency documents public: Court

 

New Delhi, July 12 (IANS) The Delhi High Court Tuesday stayed a Central Information Commission's (CIC) order to the president's office to make public all documents on declaration of the emergency in 1975 by the then president Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed, including communications from the then prime minister Indira Gandhi.

 

Justice Rajiv Sahai Endlaw issued a notice to S.C. Aggarwal, a right to information (RTI) applicant, and stayed the CIC's order till its further direction is passed.

 

The court issued notice after taking note of the submission of central public information officer (CPIO) of Rashtrapati Bhavan before the court that the documents were classified and privileged.

 

'The president's secretariat is not liable to reveal the information and the CIC has no jurisdiction in law to pass such a direction,' said the CPIO.

 

The CPIO also said that the CIC failed to bear in mind that the information it asked to disclose directly related to the records of the office of the president.

 

In doing so, the CIC failed to appreciate the scope of protection under article 74 of the constitution.

 

On June 15, the CIC asked the Rashtrapati Bhavan to make public all documents related to the declaration of the emergency.

 

The Rashtrapati Bhavan refused to disclose any information related to the advice tendered by Gandhi to Ahmed on the imposition of the emergency.

 

'The question whether any, and if so what, advice was tendered by ministers to the president shall not be enquired into in any court,' the Rashtrapati Bhavan said, citing constitutional provisions.

 

According to the CIC order, the emergency was a challenge to India's commitment to democracy and was symbolised by curtailment of fundamental rights of citizens, restrictions on the freedom of press, illegal detention, abuse of citizens and enactment of draconian laws.

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dr.s.malhotra

Emergency records not in PMO files, CIC wants it to be traced

 

PTI | Feb 9, 2012, 05.28PM IST

see here : Emergency records not in PMO files, CIC wants it to be traced - The Times of India

 

NEW DELHI: The records of correspondence between Prime Minister Indira Gandhi and President Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed relating to Emergency proclamation in 1975 are not traceable in PMO files prompting a direction by the Central Information Commission to locate and preserve them.

 

The transparency panel also directed the competent authorities in the Prime Minister's Office(PMO) to enquire into how the records of "an important post-independence event" are not traceable in the PMO files.

 

In a reply to an RTI applicant, the PMO had claimed that despite its best efforts, the communication relating to proclamation of Emergency could not be traced in its records.

 

When the matter reached the Central Information Commission(CIC), the PMO officials again reiterated the position stated in the RTI reply.

 

Although Chief Information Commissioner Satyananda Mishra did not fault the concerned officials for the missing records, he said, "we must observe that this is something surprising."

 

"The records relating to such an important event in the history of post-independence India should be carefully preserved for future and cannot be allowed to get lost in the labyrinth of government offices," Mishra said.

 

In his order, Mishra said, "we would like the competent authorities in the PMO to enquire into this matter and to ensure that these records are retrieved or traced, and should be preserved appropriately for the citizens to access."

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karira

The full order referred to in the above news report, is attached to this post.

PMO Emergency Documents.pdf

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Atul Patankar

Are those paper so inconvenient that PMO considers it better to misplace them?Actually these paapers are very important historical documents, and should be placed in a museum.

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ambrish.p

As reported in Amar Ujala on 10/02/12

 

पीएमओ से गायब हैं इमरजेंसी की फाइल

 

•सीआईसी ने अधिकारियों को खोजने और सुरक्षित रखने के आदेश दिए

 

नई दिल्ली। वर्ष 1975 में इमरजेंसी लगाने की घोषणा से संबंधित तत्कालीन प्रधानमंत्री इंदिरा गांधी और राष्ट्रपति फखरुद्दीन अली अहमद के बीच हुए पत्राचार से संबंधित फाइल प्रधानमंत्री कार्यालय (पीएमओ) से गायब है।

इस बात का खुलासा आरटीआई याचिका के जरिए पीएमओ से इमरजेंसी लगाए जाने से संबंधित दस्तावेज को सार्वजनिक करने को कहा गया। जवाब में पीएमओ ने कहा कि उनके रिकॉर्ड में यह जानकारी नहीं मिल पा रही है। जब यह मामला केंद्रीय सूचना आयोग (सीआईसी) के पास पहुंचा तब पीएमओ ने आरटीआई में दिया गया जवाब दोहरा दिया।

मामले को गंभीरता से लेते हुए सीआईसी ने अधिकारियों से संबंधित दस्तावेज का पता लगाने और सुरक्षित रखने का आदेश दिया। हालांकि मुख्य सूचना आयुक्त सत्यानंद मिश्रा नेअधिकारियों को इसके लिए दोषी नहीं माना लेकिन उन्होंने कहा कि ऐसी घटना आश्चर्यजनक है। मिश्रा ने कहा कि स्वतंत्र भारत के इतिहास की ऐसी महत्वपूर्ण घटना से संबंधित जानकारी को भविष्य के लिए सुरक्षित रखा जाना चाहिए। उन्होंने कहा कि भारत के इतिहास में इमरजेंसी महत्वपूर्ण घटनाक्रम है और इससे संबंधित जानकारी का गायब हो जाना सही नहीं है। दफ्तरों से इस तरह की फाइलें नहीं गायब होनी चाहिए। अपने आदेश में उन्होंने लिखा है कि हम चाहते हैं पीएमओ पूरे मामले की जांच करे ताकि नागरिकों को इस मामले में पूरी जानकारी मिल सके।

 

Source:

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Sajib Nandi

Ignorance isn’t always bliss

 

Editorial in Hindustantimes.com on 10 Feb, 2012

Ignorance isn

 

The Government of India is notoriously coy when it comes to bringing information that lies within its domain to public light. While most Indians have come to accept this as part of the ‘ma-baap’ State’s self-sty-led protective nature of treating information on a ‘

 

need-to-know’ basis, it is an anachronistic trait for a modern, expressedly open democracy like India. Responding to a Right To Information application regarding the records of correspondence between the then prime minister Indira Gandhi and president Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed regarding the imposition of Emergency in 1975, the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) has stated that, “despite its best efforts”, these documents can’t be traced. The Central Information Commission (CIC), adjudicating on the matter, respo-nded in turn by stating that while it didn’t find fault with the PMO officials regarding the ‘missing records’, it did find the fact that these important documents could not be traced to be “somewhat surprising”. The CIC added that “competent authorities in the PMO” should look into this matter so that the records relating to the Emergency are “retrieved or traced”.

 

The Mrs Gandhi-Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed correspondence may indeed be buried under heaps of files by some self-important bureaucrat bent on showing his loyalty to the party that imposed the Emergency more than 35 years ago and now heads the government at the Centre. But regardless of whether the documents are ‘missing’ because of an act of omission or of commission, the incident points to GoI’s standard operating procedure of withholding information that is precious to scholars and historians. In other major democracies, official documents are regular declassified. In the US, for instance, every classified document 25 years of age or older is automatically declassified, unless the National Archives and Records Administration has already sought and received that document’s exemption. Not so in India, where under the Official Secrets Act, practically everything is kept behind the curtains.

 

This enforced eclipse of historical information is not just confined to the Emergency. The Henderson-Brooks Committee report on the poor performance of the Indian Army in the Sino-Indian war of 1962, the details that led to the Bangladesh War in 1971 and documents related to the Indian Peace-Keeping Force’s foray into Sri Lanka are just a few examples of gaping invisible spots in our country’s historiography. Sensitivities and national security are moot points when it comes to keeping official documents outside the public’s purview. But surely a time-bound disclosure policy should be the norm and a ‘closure’ policy the exception. And when personal memoirs and declassified documents of other countries bring such information to light, wouldn’t it be better to be able to refute or confirm these facts by having these historical official documents out in the public domain? We certainly think so.

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Sajib Nandi

Reported by Zeenews.india.com on March 21, 2012

Govt fails to trace Emergency records

 

New Delhi: Even after a thorough search, the documents pertaining to imposition of Emergency could not be traced in Prime Minister's Office records, Lok Sabha was informed on Wednesday.

 

In reply to a question on whether the official record regarding imposition of Emergency in the year 1975 is not available in the PMO, Minister of State in the Prime Minister's Office V Narayanasamy replied, "Yes."

 

He also replied in affirmative to questions on whether the correspondence between PMO and other authorities at that time were also not available.

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The minister also said yes to a question on whether application under the Right to Information Act on the issue have been received by the PMO.

 

The minister quoted a February 3 order of the Central Information Commission which directed the competent authorities in the PMO to enquire into this matter and to ensure that these records are retrieved or traced, wherever they might be, and should be preserved appropriately for citizens to access.

 

"Following the observation made by the Central Information Commissioner, a thorough search was made to retrieve/trace records of correspondence between the then Prime Minister and the President of India relating to proclamation of emergency. However, no such records were found in the PMO," the Minister said.

 

The Commission in its order had observed that the records relating to such an important event in the history of post-independent India should be clearly preserved for future and cannot be allowed to get lost in the labyrinth of the government offices, the minister said.

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akhilesh yadav

Feb 10, 2014

 

HC Sets Aside Order on Disclosure of Info on Emergency

In a major victory for President's Secretariat, the Delhi High Court today set aside three orders of the Central Information Commission that included a decision asking disclosure of records and correspondences between then President Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed and then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi on imposition of Emergency in 1975.

 

The court also allowed the appeal of the Secretariat of President of India against the order of the apex transparency panel that had directed disclosure of information relating to communications between the Prime Minister and the President on inclusion of Scheduled Caste persons in the reservation category even after they convert to Christianity.

 

Read more at: HC Sets Aside Order on Disclosure of Info on Emergency

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