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udayindia

Applicatuion Rejected by PIO without mentioning any section of rti act

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udayindia

I had applied to CPIO for certified copies of previous question papers. In the reply the CPIO wrote that those copies are confidential and hence cannot be provided. He didn't mention any section of RTI Act under which my copies are denied.

Please help me further in to get my information.

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karira

File a first appeal to the FAA within 30 days of receiving the PIOs reply.

 

Any information can only be expempted from disclosure under Sec 8 or 9 of the RTI Act.

 

There is no such exemption for anything called "confidential" information.

 

Use the citations given in this thread: http://www.rtiindia.org/forum/62513-rti-help-information-public-authority-classified-confidential.html

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