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Why the citizens are not addressed with respect in official communication by Government?


harinder dhingra

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harinder dhingra

Dear Experts,

 

I have been noticing since my childhood that government communication to citizens are not addressed with respect. The citizen is never addressed as Sir or Madam (as the case may be) but expect us to address the officials that way in our communication. We do it as it is matter of courtesy but why not public servants because they are our servants they should atleast communicate with courtesy.

 

I intend to write to President/Prime Minister of India And of course to Governor/Chief Minister of Haryana seeking directions to all civil servants to address citizens as Sir/madam in all communications of the Government to Citizens.

 

Kindly help the undersigned with whatever knowledge input you have. As far as I am concerned I find it bizarre that official communication to me as if I am their subject.

 

Thank You very much for your time.

 

Harinder Dhingra

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harinder dhingra

They are not at addressed actually.

 

The communication starts with the matter and finishes with the matter.

 

The communication never starts with either Sir/Madam as the case may be. It does not end by communicating whether they (Government Official) are "our's truly" or "Sincerely" as we are always to them. That is what I mean Learned Mr. Karira Sir,

 

harinder dhingra

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Prasad GLN

Such procedure exists within inter office communications in other Private organisations. For any letter from Govt depts., the standard Sir, Madam is being invariably mentioned by all organisations.

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harinder dhingra

Learned Mr. G L N Prasad Sir,

 

For any letter from Govt depts., the standard Sir, Madam is being invariably mentioned by all organisations.

 

All the communications received by undersigned from Haryana Government and Central Government do not contain any of the above quoted "Sir/Madam". Only letter written by senior officers (in the form of D O ) are having the same otherwise none of the communication has those minimum courtesy words.

 

hd

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They are not at addressed actually.

 

The communication starts with the matter and finishes with the matter.

 

The communication never starts with either Sir/Madam as the case may be. It does not end by communicating whether they (Government Official) are "our's truly" or "Sincerely" as we are always to them. That is what I mean Learned Mr. Karira Sir,

 

harinder dhingra

 

 

Does the "Manual of Office Procedure" have a format for such communication with citizens ?

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harinder dhingra

No it does not have Sir,

 

The following is the text in Chapter XV of "Manual of Office Procedure"

 

 

50. Forms of written communication and methods of delivery— The different forms of written communication and methods of delivery generally used by a department are described below. Each form has a use and, in some cases, a phraseology of its own. Only black or blue ink will be used in communications. A small margin of about one inch will be left on all sides (left, right, top and bottom) of each page of communication to ensure better preservation of records as at times the paper gets torn from the edges, making reading of the documents difficult. Specimens of these forms are given in Appendix 9.

 

(1) Letter—This form is used for corresponding with Foreign Governments, State Governments, the Union Public Service Commission and other constitutional bodies, heads of attached and subordinate offices, public enterprises, statutory authorities, public bodies and members of the public generally. A letter begins with the salutation "Sir/Madam" as may be appropriate and ends with the subscription "Yours faithfully".

 

(2) Demi-official letter - (a) This form is generally used in correspondence between Government officers for an interchange or communication of opinion or information without the formality of the prescribed procedures. It may also be used when it is desired that the matter should receive personal attention of the individual addressed. Since demi-official letter is written in the first person in a personal and friendly tone, it should be addressed by an officer in a Ministry/Department who is ordinarily not more than one or two levels below the officer to whom such communication is addressed. Note: For the purpose of determination of level, Secretary/Additional Secretary and Director / Deputy Secretary will be considered as one level. (b) Communications to non-officials can also take the form of a demi-official letter.

 

(3) Office Memorandum—This form is generally used for corresponding with other Departments or in calling for information from or conveying information to its employees. It may also be used in corresponding with attached and subordinate offices. It is written in the third person and bears no salutation or subscription except the name and designation of the officer signing it.

 

(4) Inter-departmental note (I.D.Note)— (a) This form is generally employed for obtaining the advice, views, concurrence or comments of other Departments on a proposal or in seeking clarification of the existing rules, instructions etc. It may also be used by a department when consulting its attached and subordinate offices and vice versa. (b) The inter-departmental note may either be recorded on a file referred to another department or may take the form of an independent self-contained note. The subject need not be mentioned when recorded on the file itself. Note: Formerly [i.e. prior to publication of 6th Edition of CSMOP in 1975 the I.D. Note used to be known as Unofficial Note (U.O.Note)]. " UNQUOTE

 

There is no mention as to how to address the owners or citizen's of India.

 

hd

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There is no mention as to how to address the owners or citizen's of India.

hd

 

Sir, it is there in Serial No. 1:

 

and members of the public generally. A letter begins with the salutation "Sir/Madam" as may be appropriate and ends with the subscription "Yours faithfully".

 

That simply means that the officer sending you the letter is NOT following the Manual. This is against CCS rules.

 

So, if the next letter you receive does not contain the proper salutation or sign-off, then lodge a complaint (with copy of letter) to the head of the public authority and request him to direct his staff/officers to follow this particular section of the Manual of Office procedure.

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harinder dhingra
members of the public generally. A letter begins with the salutation "Sir/Madam" as may be appropriate and ends with the subscription "Yours faithfully".

 

Yes It is there. Thanks.

 

hd

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